USENET lives – sort of

I was “there” during the early days of Usenet, back when:

  • News was updated only twice a day, when our server dialed up another machine we had a mutual exchange with.
  • Business cards had bang-paths on them. For example: harvard!cfisun!palladium!nw on an old one of mine.
  • Articles were expired after just a few days because disk space was perpetually scarce.
  • The Great Renaming happened (1987) and we went from everything being “” to,,, etc.

I just naturally assumed the modern world had done away with usenet, so I was amused/surprised to find it (“USENET”) as the answer to this clue in today’s Wall Street Journal crossword puzzle:

I have to wonder what percentage of Wall St Journal crossword puzzle enthusiasts have ever heard of usenet, let alone ever posted on it!

P.S. There is no Cabal.

Fanless FreeBSD – Kingdel PC

Being a crusty UNIX guy, sometimes I prefer FreeBSD as a dedicated headless server instead of Linux. I recently needed a quiet (fanless) box and purchased this Kingdel box from Amazon.

Front view:


Rear panel:


It came with Windows10 pre-installed, which I promptly wiped out with a full installation of FreeBSD11.1 (amd64). There were only two tricky parts that I’m documenting here in the hopes that someone’s google search will stumble upon them if needed.

First, the BIOS was configured with only a 1 second delay for hitting the magic key (DELETE) to abort the Windows10 boot. I couldn’t remember the right key (is it always DELETE these days?) and since the delay was so short I couldn’t read the message “hit DELETE to stop boot” in the power-up screen. Google to the rescue and then “keep pressing DELETE over and over again during power up” worked.

Second, I had to fool with the BIOS settings to get it to recognize my external USB CD-ROM drive (containing the FreeBSD iso installation image). I had to change the power-on device recognition delay from “automatic” to “manual” and put in a 5 second delay, which made it work. Your mileage may vary depending on what external CD-ROM drive you have. I’m using one that is literally a decade old. It seems clear the Kingdel people (reasonably) turned all the delay knobs to the minimum values to speed bootup into the pre-installed Windows.

A note on how to make the WiFi work. The FreeBSD name for the WiFi device is iwn0. Follow the standard instructions for configuring FreeBSD WiFi, but note that they are written for the “ath” driver not the “iwn” driver (so substitute accordingly).

This means put the following into /etc/rc.conf:

ifconfig_wlan0="WPA SYNCDHCP"

and create the file /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf containing (for example);

   ssid="put SSID here"
   psk="put password here"

Your mileage may vary depending on your specific WiFi configuration requirements; in my case I tested this procedure just to make sure the WiFi adapter works (it did) but for my application my device is hardwired.

Two LAN interfaces, a WiFi interface, four serial ports, a zillion USB ports; Kingdel markets this as an “Industrail” computer (note misspelling, lmao). I’m using it to run a bunch of automation scripts and python code and the like, for which it is overkill (I had been running this on a Pi) but still silent.

Christmas Lights 2017

This is an update on the technology being used to drive my Christmas light display this year.


I have about 1100 feet of Red/Green/Blue LED strip around the perimeter of my roof. Because of length limitations, this is implemented as eight separate sections, each with its own separate controller. There is also a separate section on the observation tower, with its own controller.

These controllers can receive infrared (i.e., standard remote-control) commands. To control them I built an IR repeater circuit using an Arduino and wrote some python code to drive everything.

Last year’s detailed write-up is still generally correct, aside from anything new I write about here.


At the end of last year I prototyped a modification for controlling the roof perimeter (8 strands / 8 controllers) separately from the observation tower. With this modification I can have the roof perimeter all be one color while the observation tower is another color, or blink the tower but not the roof, and vice versa. I still can’t control individual strands on the roof perimeter (entire perimeter will always display identical color); however, since the boundaries of these strands are haphazard (they occur wherever one strand ends and another begins) and coarse (there are only 8 strands across the entire 1100 feet of perimeter), it’s not clear that viable effects could be had by controlling those individually. Though I may try that next year anyway (haha of course).

This year I implemented a new version of the IR repeater circuitry to let me control the roof perimeter (as a whole) separately from the tower. The new circuit looks like this (click image to open it full size if you want):



This is just a refined version of the modification I performed last year.

To control the roof perimeter, I have eight individual infrared emitters taped onto the receiving area of each of the eight controllers (one controller per strand) scattered around my roof perimeter. The leads from these emitters are connected to wires that all run back to one spot at my house where I have connected them all in series, with additional components as shown in the above circuit diagram.

The advantage, in my application, of connecting them all in series is that if any one of them fails, I’d rather have all eight of the lighting strands become non-responsive, rather than having all but one of them responding to commands. That would look wrong; it’s better to have them all stuck on one color plus that would make me notice the problem right away. This is all theoretic, as no IR emitter (or wire leads to them) has failed this year or last.

Power for the IR emitters is supplied this year by a 12V regulated power source.  Last year I used an unregulated wall-wart; this year I am using a scavenged PC board power supply.

The 38KHz IR digital PWM signal comes out of my Arduino on pin3, all as described in last-year’s article write-up. This signal drives a MOSFET gate to modulate the power to the entire string of IR emitters (which together require more power than the Arduino can drive directly; hence the 12V supply for that part of the circuit).

However, rather than feeding the 38KHz signal directly to the MOSFET gate, it is split into two and fed into two separate AND gates from an SN74HCT08 quad dual-input AND chip. The two “enable” lines – ENA1 and ENA2 – are just simple digital outputs from the Arduino and allow me to separately enable the signal on its way to the two different MOSFETs. By turning ENA1 and ENA2 on/off in my code, I can determine whether IR commands will go out to just the roof perimeter, the tower, or both.

Although we might casually think of the HIGH and LOW inputs on logic chips as being 5 volts vs zero, the TTL spec is broader than that and allows a HIGH to be as low as 2.7 volts. It turns out the SN74HCT08 AND gate output is higher than that, but it is still not high enough to drive the MOSFET gate directly like I was doing when it was being driven directly from the Arduino output pin. For this reason I also inserted a TC427 MOSFET gate driver into the MOSFET gate path. This chip converts a TTL-level input into a rail-to-rail signal (5V/0V in this case) suitable for driving a MOSFET gate input. In general it’s probably a best practice to use a driver chip like this for MOSFETs anyway, even if you are coming directly out an Arduino with sufficient voltage for the 4.5V logic-level requirement of this particular MOSFET gate.


I wrote about my software extensively before and put a repository,  arduino-json-IO on github that implements a tiny web server in an Arduino and allows you to send it commands to perform various digital I/O operations. One of those commands allows you to send PWM-modulated IR codes. This makes extensive use of the Arduino IRRemote library to do the actual PWM control.

The IRRemote library outputs these PWM waveforms on pin 3, which becomes the “IR” signal in my circuit diagram above.

The new question, with the enable lines, becomes how to manage those. I could just have used the existing capabilities of arduino-json-IO and explicitly managed the enable lines by writing pseudo-code like this:

# to do something with just the tower
POST "set ENA1 low" command to arduino
POST "set ENA2 high"
POST "IR command for a tower color"

but this is cumbersome and, more importantly, it requires multiple HTTP transactions between the python code driving all this and the poor little arduino generating the IR codes (and enables). Of course, this could be factored out since we only need to send the enable line commands when they need to change from their current state, but that would then require keeping track of the output enable states, and also would be subject to getting “out of sync” if, for example, the arduino server rebooted due to a bug, or a power glitch.

To avoid all that, I decided to customize the generic arduino-json-IO library to add the enable lines directly into the JSON structure sent along with each POST request to the IR emitter code. The way it works now is that the enable lines are set high when an “enable: xxx” directive is encountered in the JSON (“xxx” being the pin to set high) and any pin that was set high as a result of doing that is returned to LOW when the POST request processing is finished. This makes the management of the enable pins be, essentially, an “atomic” operation tied in with each individual POST request that sends IR codes.

The revised code is available here:

Admittedly this isn’t as “generic” as it could be, but the beauty of something like Arduino is that it’s not unreasonable to customize the embedded software for a specific application, which is exactly what is going on here with this modification.

Given all that let’s review the old way a “heartbeat” effect was created with the arduino-json-IO IR POST command. The JSON I sent looked like this:


The minimum gap that I found reliable between IR commands was 175msec (175000 microseconds). Call that period of time a “beat”. The above JSON commands the lights to be RED (16718565) for 3 “beats” (about half a second – 525msec), OFF for one beat (175msec), RED for 3 beats, OFF for 6 beats, and then repeats that entire cycle 10 times. This creates a “heart beat” like effect on the lights, all with one POST operation to the arduino server.

With the enable-line modification, that POST request now looks like this:


Where pins 6 and 7 are my ENA1 and ENA2 pins (roof perimeter enable and tower enable). The arduino server will drive those pins HIGH when the “enable” element is encountered in the “codes” sequence, and will return them to LOW at the end of the “codes” sequence. In this way the management of the enable pins becomes atomic and stateless with respect to any given POST operation.

I wrote some python library code to encapsulate all this into an “XMASLED” object, with methods such as “heartbeat” that would generate the above JSON code and post it to the server. The question then became how to control which enable lines to turn on/off in any given request. I decided to use python context managers for this, instead of explicit “enable” / “disable” method calls. Conceptually the XMASLED object contains two state variables for the enables – “enable_tower”, and “enable_perim”, and the various methods such as heartbeat() use them to form the above JSON. The only thing the context managers do is provide a syntactic sugar allowing these variables to be saved/restored and automatically returned to the prior values on return (or exception) from a nested structure. Thus, the python code to run the heartbeat routine only on the tower, while having the roof be green, looks something like this:

# "X" is the XMASLED object
with X.tower_only():

Arguably this is overkill, it wouldn’t have been the end of the world to write:

# (assume both enables are ON already)

but the context manager way seemed a lot prettier, and it is robust against any exceptions (e.g., network down) that might throw us out of heartbeat and up to some higher level without knowing that the internal state for the perimeter enable was still “off”.

It’s hard to know where to stop with this idea of using a JSON data structure as a primitive programming language to have the arduino drive the IR emitters on its own. I’ve drawn the line at the spot we see here; enable pin management, sequences of individual codes, intra-code delays, and repeat counts can all be specified in a single POST command. Anything else requires multiple posts to the Arduino and management by higher-level code (i.e., python in my case).


As I wrote about last year, these cheap controller boxes for the LED strands are really the wrong solution for this application. It’s fun that I’ve managed to build an integrated control system to operate 9 of them in unison via wifi and a baby web server interpreting JSON POSTs,  but every now and then one of the controllers misses a code (just like sometimes your TV seems to miss a button press on your remote control) and shows the wrong color. Plus there are other features people clamor for (“Can the lights change with the music?”) that can never be pragmatically implemented so long as my only control mechanism is limited to imitating an IR remote control.

So, I’m not sure about next year; I think I will be investigating higher-end commerical-grade control systems that already have integrated networking capability and are meant to be controlled “at scale” with multiple units at once. We’ll see…

Redeploying the Christmas Lights!

Almost ready to go again this year. I had a case from my now-dead soekris system; took everything out except the regulated 12V power supply and repurposed the case to hold all this nonsense (including the new “control the tower separately from the roof perimeter” circuit design).

Working in the lab – now to hook it up to the real LED strings (they went up on the roof this week but are currently dark until I hook this back up). Hoping nothing explodes!

My Lutron Experience

I have three Lutron home automation controllers in my house. They operate the motorized window shades and the exterior landscape lighting. My architect wanted me to have many more of these – to control all of the interior lighting. I vetoed that idea and insisted on regular, “you can buy them at home depot” switches for all my interior circuits. I am so glad I did that!

Here’s my Lutron installation with the covers off:

Three Lutron Automation Processors

The reason the covers are off today is because two of them died in a recent power failure. This happens “often”, this is the third time in nine years of owning these that I’ve had to call the automation company in to replace them.

Maybe you don’t think three times in nine years is “often” – but let me ask you this. When was the last time you replaced your microwave oven because of a power failure? How about your TV? Look around your house at all the equipment these days that has a computer inside it – pretty much every appliance you own has one. How many of them have you ever had to replace simply because the voltage fluctuated during a storm and killed the device?

I’m sure it happens from time-to-time, but the consumer-grade appliance manufacturers know that they would have a very bad reputation if their equipment died all the time in power failures. Lutron? Apparently doesn’t care. These processors must have little or no input voltage protection and any glitch on the power lines burns them out. Then, even if just one of them burns out, you end up having to replace all three because the company is constantly obsoleting old versions of these processors when new ones are released. New ones won’t interoperate with old ones.

It’s outrageously bad engineering and it’s hard not to point out that this bad engineering increases sales of the Lutron devices and the billable-hours of the installation/programming service providers.

I “fixed” the “one failed, but you have to replace all three” dilemma by stocking several additional processors the first time I got hosed by that. Unfortunately, today I am having the last spare installed and the next power-glitch will force an upgrade of all three even if just one dies. I am now investigating front-ending the power inputs on these devices with some server-room grade power conditioning instead.

Never, ever, ever, ever, ever allow anyone to talk you into installing this product in your house.

Why the “new” NIST password recommendation makes sense

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently released a new recommendation on authentication, including best practices for constructing passwords.

DISCLAIMER: I am not a password security expert. But I can do some math.

You are already familiar with the previous/old NIST recommendations because these are the recommendations that drive you crazy:

  • Use upper case and lower case
  • Use numbers
  • Use special characters (!@#$% etc)

One way or another those recommendations have worked their way into almost every system in use today, with the corresponding rules that you curse at when you are setting up a new account.

The new rules say that it’s better to just use some number of words in a phrase. No digits or special characters needed.


Let’s look at the history of password technology and do some math. Don’t be scared – we won’t be doing anything more difficult than raising a number to a power — which, in a throwback to the old days of Fortran, I will represent in this note using ** as in: 2**3 is 8:

2 ** 3 = 2 * 2 * 2 = 8

If I happen to know that your password is only two characters long, perhaps because I heard how many keyclicks there were when you typed it in, and I can guess that (like most people) you picked your password only from lowercase letters from a to z, then how many passwords would I have to try to guess yours? The answer is that there are 26 letters to choose from, therefore:

N = 26 ** 2 = 676

There are only 676 two-character lowercase passwords I have to try if I want to search all the possibilities to break your password. I can break your password by simply trying every combination “aa”, “ab”, “ac” … “zx”, “zy”, “zz” until I find the one that works.

In the old days passwords were usually limited to 8 characters. This limit can be traced all the way back to late 1970s Unix implementations of the DES password encryption algorithms. In the early days of the web most web site servers were running on Unix boxes that still used the same password code from the 1970s and often still had the eight character limit.

Obviously, 676 passwords won’t take very long for someone to try (by computer), which is why password software usually required you to use more characters – often times making you use an eight character password. A dirty little secret of some of those older systems is that they’d let you set a longer password, but in fact only ever computed based on the first eight. The old NIST recommendations were written during a time when that was still a consideration.

If I still know that you only used lowercase letters and there is a maximum of 8 characters, there are:

N = 26 ** 8 = approximately 208 billion

password possibilities.

When crackers “steal password files” from hacked web sites, what they get is not the passwords themselves, but rather their encrypted forms. This looks like a bunch of gibberish characters. When a web site checks your password, it asks you for your password, encrypts it, and sees if it gets the same gibberish it got back when you first set your password.

Web sites generally never store your original password and there is no way to recover the original password from this encrypted gibberish. Thus, when the bad guys steal a “password” file what they really have to do is just guess every possible password, putting each guess through the encryption software, until they find one that matches the gibberish string they have gotten their hands on.

So we can see the advantage of an 8 character password, instead of a 2 character password, is that they will have to try roughly 208 billion guesses to find your password. Technically, on average, they will have to try half of that before they get lucky and find yours, but for the rest of this memo I will ignore that factor of 2 because it’s not really significant and just clutters the discussion.

When computers were slower, running the DES algorithm 208 billion times would take a long enough that it wasn’t much of a threat. The calculations could take weeks, but as computers got faster and faster that number gradually came down and with modern machines this is now a practical method of attack.

This is why the old password recommendations suggested that you use more characters than just lowercase a to z. If, for example, you randomly picked from uppercase and lowercase characters, there would be 52 possibilities for each position in your password, and the number of guesses required to crack your password went up dramatically:

N = 52 ** 8 = 53.4 TRILLION

Simply by adding upper case into the equation the number of possible passwords increases by a factor of 256 (those of you who are insightful with math will note that we doubled the choices – from 26 to 52, and since there are 8 password characters the possibilities increased by a factor of 2 ** 8 = 256)

If digits (another 10 possible characters) and special characters (!@#$% etc) are added, the possible choices go up to 80 or more. Let’s take 80 possible characters and see what we get:

N = 80 ** 8 = 1677 TRILLION

That looks like a lot of possibilities. And it could be even higher because there are actually more than 80 choices of possible characters people could use in their passwords. But there are some problems. In reality humans get annoyed by all those rules and usually pick passwords that aren’t really randomly selected from all possible characters and they do other things that reduce the possible number of passwords that have to be guessed.

Let’s go back to the upper and lower case combinations (and ignore digits and special characters for now). I said there were

N = 52 ** 8 = 53.4 TRILLION

possible combinations for choosing 52 characters (upper and lower case a to z) eight times. But when most people see this message:

Password must contain at least one upper case character

what do they do in reality?

They take their lame password, and capitalize one letter of it to get past this rule.

How many combinations of passwords are there, if as a bad guy I am reasonably assured that your password only has one uppercase character? Now instead of 52 possibilities for each character, there are still only 26 possibilities, and then there are 8 choices for which one of the positions is going to be upper case.  Therefore, instead of:

N = 52 ** 8 = 53.4 TRILLION

possibilities, there are really only:

N = 26 ** 8 * 8 = 1.6 TRILLION

A similar problem occurs with the digits and special character rules. Many people just substitute numbers for letters in a fairly predictable way, e.g., using the digit zero for the letter “o”, and the digit 3 for the letter “e”, and similar things like that. We all do this, thus many passwords in the real world look like these:


The bad guys know that people do this, and when they write their guessing software they don’t have to go through all of the character possibilities. The real number of strings they have to guess is much, much, lower than the simple exponentiation math would imply. This knowledge dramatically decreases the number of possibilities that have to be computed to try to crack your password, and the sophisticated cracking software incorporates knowledge such as “try ordinary words but substitute the number 3 for e” and similar tendencies.

Over time the eight character limit went away, so longer passwords became possible, and many web sites will allow you to have fairly long passwords but still encouraged you to use all sorts of random characters in an attempt to make that exponentiation math work out to a large number.

But people still pick bad passwords because a truly random password like “x@8Q-99!va@:d” is just impossible to remember; no one picks passwords like that.

The new recommendation from NIST takes that into account, and instead recommends that you just pick a phrase that you can remember and no one else would know. This assumes that modern password systems can accept much longer passwords – which most can (it is likely that there is no practical limit in most software these days, though sometimes the web designers impose limits on the login screens).

So let’s look at some math. Suppose you picked a four word phrase from the vocabulary of an 8 year old child. How many passwords are possible?

According to various studies, the average 8 year old native speaker has a vocabulary of about 10000 words. This means that there are:

N = 10000 ** 4 = 10,000 TRILLION

This number is already 6 times higher than the 80 character, fully-random, 8 character calculation, and keep in mind that we already debunked that math as overly generous because no real human being ever actually picks those gibberish characters randomly. This implies that the advantage of the four word random phrase is far greater than “just” a factor of six we just calculated here.

Most adults will have even larger vocabularies, in the neighborhood of 20,000 to 35,000 words, so the number of four-word phrases you might pick for your password becomes even larger.

Now, of course, people are still people, and they might still pick bad passwords even if they are made out of multiple words:

this is my password
I hate password rules
you can't guess this

and so forth. But if you pick a password that:

  • is selected from a wide range of words
  • uses at least one “unusual” word
  • isn’t obviously based on something people might know about you
  • but is still easy for you to remember

then simply combining four words into a phrase and using that as your password is likely to be more secure than eight characters of gibberish. So, as systems around the web start getting updated to conform to the new password recommendations, hopefully you’ll be able to use passwords like these:

lemon blue flying campfire
tree eating pickle moon
disintegrating alien cheese sundae

It would be best if you tried to include some unusual words; remember, you are trying to make the bad guys have to guess from as many words as possible. Though, even if you stick to “just words an eight year old would know” there are roughly 10,000 choices and that already makes your password harder to guess than a realistic eight character “old style” password. Personally I can type pretty well, so “disintegrating alien cheese sundae” is something I could potentially envision using as a password (ooops, ok, not now that I’ve published this haha).

The beauty of the new NIST recommendations is that most people should be able to come up with memorable passwords that are difficult to guess and draw from between 10,000 and 20,000 words for each word in the phrase. The math is inexorable: there are more combinations for these passwords than there are for shorter gibberish passwords.

Of course, if you pick an obvious phrase that a bad guy can guess, that’s your fault. Don’t set your new password to “I love my cat” if everyone knows you love your cat.

If you are paying attention, you will note that the new NIST recommendations are somewhat equivalent to saying “hey, just use a longer password”. So my example of “disintegrating alien cheese sundae” is actually a password of length 33 (including the spaces). Thus in some sense the NIST recommendation isn’t really anything new or earth-shattering. We already know that every time you add one character to a password, it gets harder to guess by a factor related to how many possible characters there are. In fact, a 33 character random password made out of only lowercase letters would have:

N = 26 ** 33 = an enormously large number (10 to the 46th)

possibilities. But, of course, no one is going to have a 33 character random password because it would be impossible to remember. So the NIST recommendation is actually a sneaky way to get us to have longer passwords, at the cost of choosing from a less-than-random set of characters (i.e., those that combine into actual words). There’s no magic here, it’s simply the observation that the longer the password is the better it is, and if we have to give up some randomness (fewer character choices than totally random) to get to this longer password length, the math still works out favorably.

I’m looking forward to getting rid of my ridiculous eight character gibberish passwords and replacing them with easier to remember phrases, though I imagine it may take many years for the tedious old NIST suggestions to become thoroughly debunked and for the newer methodology to find its way into account password rules.

Netgate SG-4860 installed

Finally got rid of the last soekris/pfsense router in my empire. This sg-4860 replaces a net6501-70 that had 8 intel interfaces. I “need” (well, use) five, and have plans for a sixth subnet. The Netgate box has six interfaces so it suffices both for the current needs and the planned one-additional subnet. I don’t anticipate ever going beyond the sixth subnet, and if I do there’s always VLAN trunking options to get more interfaces out of the existing box (and/or multi-hop routing via a secondary router)

Installation went without any glitches. Still running pfsense in basically the same configuration; just had to update the interface names in the configuration XML file.

Now the question is what to do with an old, but perfectly functional, nanoBSD/freeBSD box…

Ordered replacement for my last Soekris router

I am down to my last (and largest configuration) net 6501 pfsense router, and just ordered a replacement for it from netgate. I’ve already replaced two other routers in my world (at other locations) with netgate products. The nice thing about them is they are directly supported with pfsense, so it’s just an easy way to go once you’ve decided to run pfsense.

This last one, at the hilltop, has been up now for over 454 days:







The router is (obviously) on a UPS. I’ve had the router for even much longer than that; I’m not entirely sure what made me reboot it over a year ago – probably a software upgrade.

Alas, it is time to replace it, primarily because I want to be able to run the newest versions of pfsense that no longer support 32-bit platforms. This box can run in 64-bit mode, but the board itself lacks one specific feature the generic freeBSD 64-bit build requires. I know I can still run pfsense by taking the stock distribution and wedging in a custom kernel build, but it just seems wiser to replace this box with something newer and fully supported anyway.

I took the easy (albeit expensive-ish) way out and ordered a netgate SG-4860-1U. I use 5 different networks in my configuration (only four made it into the screen capture) and though I could certainly achieve that via “router on a stick” with VLAN trunking and a suitable switch, I prefer to have a router with true multiple NICs on general principles.

Not sure what I will do with the soekris box when the new netgate gear arrives; it makes a great Unix freeBSD sandbox but I really have no use for such a thing. Maybe I can turn it into some ridiculous lego contraption controller someday 🙂

Amazon AWS Route53 Region: us-east-1

This is one of those things that seems hard to find even though it is in fact documented, so I thought I’d post this note in the hope that someday it will pop up on someone’s google and be helpful.

So, here are some keywords of note: This is about Route53, the DNS service in Amazon AWS, and the “region” field. The way I ran into it I was using the DynamicDNS feature in my router (pfsense), which can directly update a Route53 record. But it wants the ZoneID in this form:


I had a ZoneID — they look something like “Z2X8NGLIQTGFO4” (I’ve altered this from what my real ZoneID is of course). But I didn’t know what my region is. In general “my” (best/default) region is “us-west-2” but that didn’t work (generated a complaint about an invalid region). I couldn’t find any way to reveal what the correct region for my Route53 service was.

The reason is … all Route53 services are in us-east-1. That is in fact documented but you really have to dig into the AWS docs to find it if you didn’t already know where to look. So, since it took me a while to find, I wrote this note, in the hope that someone else might stumble onto it via google and get to this answer more easily than I did.

It’s extremely frustrating because the user interface will show you the ZoneID but seems to have no information at all on the Region. It would have been nice if they threw that in the info panel even though the answer is always just us-east-1. Oh well.